Category Archives: Photography

Heart of Stone

 

Spello’s well preserved town walls remain surprisingly complete. At the highest point is the Belvedere with its extensive views over the Topino valley and its Roman archway. Leave the main streets and lose yourself in the quiet medieval alleyways crowded with interlocked stone houses with flower-filled balconies.

Spello is built on the lower slopes of Mount Subasio. The pink marble from the mountain was used to build the town, giving it a rosy hue, especially at sunrise and sunset. The striations in the stones show the ridges and grooves  of movements in the rocks over millions of years.

The remains of the Arch of Augustus form part of a later wall, its original Roman inscription visible.

The walls show the changes to building facades over the centuries; here a doorway has been bricked up, still using the local marble.

Each turn, each tiny alley brings its rewards, with plants and flowers, delicate handrails and secret arches. Who knows where that street will lead? Who cares, when there is time to explore?

I place my hand on the ancient stones in sunlight and they are warm to the touch. The marble absorbs and stores the heat, releasing it when the day cools down. The walls are thick, keeping the houses cool in summer and warm in winter. The roofs are made from layers of crafted Roman tiles, normally on a wooden frame or barrel vaults. The colours of the tiles change as they weather. The result is picture perfect.

I stand with my back to the stones and wonder what tales they could tell, what changes they have seen and how many people have passed them by. I am just one visitor, just one more person passing through this town of pink stones. But this visitor will be back. Spello may  have a heart of stone, but it is entwined with my own.

 

 

 

 

 

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Castle on the Hill

On a previous visit to Spoleto, we had taken the escalators from the walls of the city to its summit. This time we took the underground, moving walkways. They would not have looked out of place in a science fiction film, with their shiny tiles and endless horizon. There were breaks at certain points where it was possible to exit at various levels of the city, but we went right to the end where the fortress of La Rocca dominates the skyline. Built in the 13th century to protect the Papal territories, it was associated with, amongst others, both Cesare Borgia and Lucrezia Borgia.

From the fortress there are extensive views across the city, including a bird’s eye view of the cathedral….

….and the mountains beyond….

The piazza outside the cathedral is beautiful, and when the sun shines, the mosaics on the front of the building are golden bright.

It was a dull day, but there are always restaurants to explore. We found a local Osteria at the top of this slope.

Wending our way back down the city’s hills, the lovely, arched streets were a pleasure to visit….

….and we even found a disdainful lion….

Food Glorious Food

There are many reasons to visit Italy. It is a country full of history, art and magnificent architecture. It has an endless coastline with aquamarine seas, long stretches of untrodden sand and craggy cliffs. Its people are warm, welcoming, noisy and passionate. But if you love good food and wines, then perhaps that’s enough of a reason to come here.

Find a quiet bar with a fabulous view and pause with a prosecco….

….or stop in a welcoming wine bar to smell the roses….

….and taste some local meats and cheeses….

Try somewhere new, and sample olive oils from all over Italy. Peppery, lemony, spicy….

….perfectly matched with a panzanella that’s as pretty as a picture….

….or tender steak tartare with liver pate and tomato salad….

….and melting  artichokes like petal-strewn bells….

Pass the cutlery please!

With special thanks to Bar Bonci, Vinosofia and Extra Vergine OLeOteca, all proud Spello bars.

In the Still of the Night

Strolling round Spello at night is a wonderful experience. The day-trippers have left, the streets are quiet and the shutters are closed on the many windows. The Propertius Towers flank the western gate into the town, their restored Roman remains surrounding a medieval entrance. Beyond, the lights of Foligno and Montefalco shine through the darkness.

The main piazza has been recently refurbished, its clean lines contrasting with the previous rather haphazard arrangement.The changes have been controversial. It seems that there was little or no consultation with the people of Spello – the Spellani – over the plans. There is lingering discontent still, and it remains to be seen whether any further changes will be made. A bronze statue of The Return of Saint Frances by Norberto is sited in the piazza. It’s a lovely thing, but it is a copy of the statue outside the basilica in nearby Assisi, and although Norberto was a native of Spello, the locals feel that it is not sufficiently original for Spello. Close to the statue is a white metal tree, ugly by day and barely improved by night when its branches are lit. The original fountain has been refurbished; previously it rarely worked, but now it is in full working order and an asset to the piazza.

At the moment, when darkness falls, the square is lit in the colours of the Italian flag. There are rumours that this is a temporary measure but, Spello Commune, if you listen to the people you will hear that they want the lights to stay. For what it’s worth, I’d like them to stay too.

Heaven is a Place on Earth

Blue Nun, Spello

Blue Nun, Spello

Italy remains a Catholic country and there are many Italians for whom religion remains part of the daily ritual, whether they live a cloistered life, such as in Spello’s ancient Vallegloria Convent, or by making their own personal spiritual journey. We stepped out of a doorway and found ourselves caught up in a procession, a microphone and loud-hailer leading the chanted prayers, the street brimming with people.

Nuns in the Sun, Spello

Nuns in the Sun, Spello

The nearby town of Assisi, birthplace of Saint Francis, is an important stop on the ancient pilgrim’s route from Tuscany to Rome. Spello is one of the many hill towns visited along the way. Not everybody walks the entire route, but this section with its rolling green hills and proximity to Assisi is particularly popular.

Did I hear something?

Did I hear something?

The Spellani watch the procession in the narrow streets, leaning out of high windows or peeping between the balcony railings. Everybody loves a spectacle.

Well Hidden, Spello

Well Hidden Flower Girls, Spello

It’s time for us to bid farewell once again to Spello. Like lovers we make promises about returning soon. We greet friends for the final time and say arrivederci – until we meet again. We linger in our favourite wine bar, Vinosofia, listening to the legendary Miles Davis, one more Martini for the road, stirred not shaken. If ever heaven was a place on earth, it’s Spello. Taxi’s here. I wipe away a tear….

Lost in Contemplation

Lost in Contemplation

“We leave something of ourselves behind when we leave a place: we stay there, even though we go away. And there are things in us that we can find again only by going back there.”― Pascal Mercier, Night Train to Lisbon

Thanks for coming along for the ride. Did you enjoy it?

Street Life

Baby You Can Drive My Car

Baby You Can Drive My Car

In the warm autumn sunshine, Spello attracts few tourists and can often be quiet and still. The restaurants with their delicious dishes celebrating local food and wines remain open, the scent of herbs wafting from their busy kitchens. The cafes still spill out onto the pavements where the afternoons drift lazily by, fuelled by strong coffee and Aperol spritz.

Paws for Thought

Paws for Thought, Spello

On the street, life continues on. The children are back at school now, and in the early mornings and afternoons their excited chatter echoes in the narrow passageways. Workers continue to improve the road surface, vehicles squeezed into the narrow streets, blocking any traffic.

Parking Problems?

Parking Problems? Spello

In the town square, old men sit chatting whilst old women fill their baskets with ingredients for dinner. A Fiat 500 (cinquecento) – ideal for the narrow roads – screeches past, its distinctive engine stutter and rattle a regular sound here on the street.

For Ishita, as promised!

For Ishita, as promised!

During the afternoon pausa, shutters are closed and the sound of clattering plates and talking can be heard from the cool interiors. Now and then people stroll by, keeping to the shade of the buildings.

Strolling, Spello

Strolling, Spello

In nearby Montefalco, even the statues have sunglasses to protect them in the heat of the day…

Blues Brothers Chef, Montefalco

Blues Brothers Chef, Montefalco

….and these young girls look cool as they whizz around the medieval villages with a scooter tutor….

Scooting, Montefalco

Scooting with a Scooter Tutor, Montefalco

But even on the warmest day there is often a hint of rain in the air, as the clouds gather over nearby Mount Subasio. Armed for any weather, this wonderful friend is all smiles….

One of my Crew, Spello

One of my Crew, Spello

How can a day be so perfect? Perhaps you have a perfect day too?

Blue,

Blue Remembered Hills, Spello

All Shook Up

Detail, Pillar of Hercules, Foligno

Detail, Pillar of Hercules, Foligno

Five minutes by train from Spello is the sprawling town of Foligno. We had visited before but left disappointed, firstly because it was cold and drizzly and few places look good in the rain and secondly because it was still undergoing repairs after the 1997 earthquake. On a warm, sunny day with a cloudless blue sky, we decided Foligno was worth another look.

Foligno, Cathedral

Foligno, Cathedral, Piazza Grande

The cathedral of San Feliciano was begun in 1133. The highlight is the pink marble facade in Piazza della Repubblica but it is stunning from all angles. The square, badly damaged in the earthquake, was once again buzzing with life. Unusually flat in contrast to the surrounding hill towns, Foligno’s streets are full of bicycles.

Foligno Cathedral

Foligno Cathedral, Piazza della Repubblica

The main cathedral entrance is guarded by the sweetest looking lions imaginable. Note the shiny ear, presumably from years of gentle stroking!

Lovely Lion, Foligno Cathedral

Lovely Lion, Foligno Cathedral

The sweeping stone staircase displays the arms of a bishop, complete with mitre and crozier….

Bishop's Arms, Foligno Cathedral

Bishop’s Arms, Foligno Cathedral

The interior is a neo-classical in style, dating from the 18th and 19th centuries. These alterations were carried out by Guiseppe Piermarini – of whom more later – who removed earlier modifications. Unfortunately this work obscures the wonderful rose window which is barely visible from inside. Statues peek out from behind tall white columns….

Foligno Cathedral

Foligno Cathedral

There was one work of art we particularly wanted to see: Elvio Marchionni’s paintings in the Chapel of the Sacrament. I had the pleasure of interviewing the artist last year and the works in this cathedral did not disappoint.

Elvio Marchionni, Foligno Cathedral Chapel

Elvio Marchionni, Detail, Foligno Cathedral Chapel

Outside of the old town centre, many of Foligno’s buildings are modern, but there are some wonderful large houses that caught my eye. Here a young girl stands motionless framed by a magnificent window….

Foligno

Foligno

Pastel coloured walls and fine details are everywhere….

Detail, Foligno

Detail, Foligno

….and a contrast between old and new is reflected in this modern glass building….

Reflected Glory, Foligno

Reflected Glory, Foligno

I mentioned Giuseppe Piermarini earlier and promised to return to him. Born in Foligno in 1734 and later apprenticed in Rome, Piermarini was the greatest neo-classical architect of his day. He is best remembered for designing the La Scala theatre which opened in 1778 in Milan. Here in Foligno the theatre bears his name; it is not as well known but is an architectural gem in its own right.

Piermarini Theatre, Foligno

Piermarini Theatre, Foligno

Turning down a quiet street in search of coffee, we stepped into the Piazza Piermarini with its bronze statue of Hercules supporting a tall obelisk.

Pillar of Hercules, Foligno

Pillar of Hercules, Foligno

This monument is dedicated to Piermarini and its fine details show plans and pictures of some of his works, including La Scala. It also details many tiny turtles as the successful contemporary sculptor, Ivan Thiemer, often uses turtles in his works. Turtles have a symbolism in many cultures associated with longevity, happiness, silence and even magic.

Detail, Pillar of Hercules, Foligno

Detail, Pillar of Hercules, Foligno

In revisiting Foligno we found the old centre revitalised after its repairs and discovered an architectural genius, a son of Foligno who was entirely unknown to us previously but whose name lives on in his splendid works.

Courtyard, Foligno

Courtyard, Foligno