Tag Archives: Basilica di Santa Maria Maggiore

Blah, blah, blah

IMG_1052

In previous posts I have written about some of the artists of Spello and Umbria. These artists have one thing in common: they are all dead. Unsurprising, of course, as they painted largely in the medieval and Renaissance periods. You may think, therefore, that living artists have nothing to contribute, and maybe cannot compare with the sheer genius of those who have gone before. But there is an artist born in Spello in 1944 and still living and working here who creates works of art so beautiful that perhaps he really does bear comparison to past masters. The artist in question is Elvio Marchionni.

IMG_1063

IMG_1069

Elvio Marchionni attended the Art Institute of Bernadino di Betto of Perugia (the “little painter”, Pinturicchio), where he explored medieval painting techniques, the classics and the great past masters. His palette is one of subdued colours, and many of his works resemble frescoes destroyed by the effects of time. He has exhibited all over Italy, including at the Venice Biennale of Sacred Arts, as well as in Paris, Madrid, Germany and the US.

His works can be seen in nearby Foligno, both in the Cathedral and in the apse of the church at Scopoli. In Spello there is a painting by Elvio Marchionni in the church of Santa Maria Maggiore and another of St Veronica on the facade of one of the buildings in the main street.

Spello town

We had seen numerous posters around town advertising an event on behalf of the Marchionni Foundation at the former church of Saint Michael Archangel. We were not entirely sure what the event entailed, but we had seen canvasses being prepared and chairs being set out, so not wanting to miss anything we decided to go along.

DSC_0056

The little church was full; all around were hung lovely art works, large and small. There were TV cameras and interviewers, photographers and local dignitaries. We managed to find seats and sat back to observe proceedings. We had thought that there might be a few words said about Signor Marchionni, then we would have a chance to view the paintings.

Well, the dignitaries stood up one by one and talked, and talked and talked…..An hour later they were still going strong, emphasising their points with lots of arm-waving and rousing finales.

We have been a bit smug about using our Italian and were proud of the fact that we can understand at least part of the conversations around us. But we came back to earth with a huge bump that evening when we could only extract something along the following lines. “Blah, blah Caravaggio. Blah, blah Perugino. British Museum, blah, blah. Pinturicchio blah, blah. Maestro Elvio Marchionni, blah, blah.” I exaggerate for effect, but not by much.

IMG_1047

At last, the artist himself stood up to speak. He is a quietly spoken man who clearly prefers to let his art do the talking. He is passionate about art and equally passionate about sharing his knowledge with others, particularly young people. Encouraging tourists, school children and artists alike to understand the creative process and how works of art are produced is part of the Foundation’s plan.

With an allusion to the past, through his Foundation he is also aiming to recreate the relationship between the artist and his disciples, moving from theory to practice, learning the trade, inspiring each other, exchanging ideas and creativity.

We never did get to see all of the beautiful art works on display, but judge for yourself from the small selection included here how stunning they are. Elvio Marchionni, you are an inspiration.

IMG_1055

IMG_1067

IMG_1071

IMG_1056

Advertisements

Endless Art

Spello may be a tiny town, but it houses some of the very finest art works in this region. Those who come here for the day head straight to the fine church of Santa Maria Maggiore where Spello’s art jewels are to be found.

The Church of Santa Maria Maggiore, Spello

The Church of Santa Maria Maggiore, Spello

The church was completed in 1285, but its crumbling facade was reconstructed in the 17th century, using the original materials. It stands in a small square paved with medieval cistern covers. The 2 large fluted columns in marble which you can see at the foot of the bell tower are the remains of an earlier, Roman structure; the church was built on an important Roman road that ran through this area.

Inside, there is a single, wide nave and seven altars. The light filters through the many windows, highlighting the rich stucco decoration, paintings and sculptures. But it is the Baglioni Chapel that, rightly, commands attention. The decoration was commissioned by Troilo Baglioni who was the Prior of Santa Maria Maggiore in the 16th century. The artist was Bernadino de Betto, more commonly known by his nickname Pinturicchio – “little painter”. This nickname referred to his short stature, not to his artistic talent.

Pinturrichio joined the Perugia painters guild around 1481, the same year in which he collaborated with the artist Pietro Vannucci, known as Perugino, on some frescoes for the walls of the Vatican’s Sistine Chapel in Rome. Pinturrichio also decorated the (Papal) Borgia apartments and a produced a fresco series for the library of Siena cathedral. He painted the Baglioni Chapel in 1500 to 1501. His work is highly decorative with superb attention to detail, particularly in his figures. Like other artists of his age, the women are depicted as graceful and serene and the landscapes have depth and an air of peace. Pinturrichio is said to have influenced other Umbrian artists such as Raphael, who was apprenticed to Perugino.

The Dispute in the Temple by Pinturrichio, Santa Maria Maggiore, Spello

The Dispute in the Temple by Pinturrichio, Santa Maria Maggiore, Spello

Baglione can be seen at the far left of this picture dressed in his black habit, standing next to his treasurer in a blue robe holding a bag of money.

Annunciation (detail showing self-portrait of Pinturrichio, by Pinturrichio. Santa Maria Maggiore, Spello

Annunciation (detail showing self-portrait of Pinturrichio, by Pinturrichio. Santa Maria Maggiore, Spello

Adoration of the Child (detail) by Pinturicchio. Santa Maria Maggiore, Spello

Adoration of the Child (detail) by Pinturicchio. Santa Maria Maggiore, Spello

The floor of the Chapel is made of small, glazed majolica tiles dated 1566 from nearby Deruta, showing winged horses, birds and plant motifs.

Also represented in the church is Perugino, whose 2 works here date from around 1521.

Pieta with St John and Mary Magdalene by Perugino. Santa Maria Maggiore, Spello

Pieta with St John and Mary Magdalene by Perugino. Santa Maria Maggiore, Spello

Madonna and Child with St Catherine and St Biagio

Madonna and Child with St Catherine and St Biagio

I have mentioned before that we are staying in part of the ex-nunnery of Santa Chiara (Saint Clare). The church houses an oil painting from this house which was formerly a panel used to partition the closed-order nuns from the public. This painting, from around 1700, is attributed to Carlo Lamperelli, who was born in Spello. Unfortunately I have struggled to find a good photograph of this painting which, even in the flesh, is rather dark and unclear.

Panel from Santa Chiara by Carlo Lamperelli. Santa Maria Maggiore, Spello.

Panel from Santa Chiara by Carlo Lamperelli. Santa Maria Maggiore, Spello.

The church of Santa Maria Maggiore is a treasure house. The Baglioni Chapel is a masterpiece. I don’t mind paying my 2 Euros to light up these frescoes as I fully understand the need to protect them from excessive light. However, an opaque glass panel has been constructed across the front of the Chapel, restricting visitors from seeing the frescoes without paying, and since there is not always someone on hand to pay your money to, I saw many visitors leave the church without having had the chance to view these masterpieces. Aside from that, the glass barrier is extremely ugly and it ruins the lines of the church. Remove this monstrosity, powers that be. Charge us to light the frescoes like other churches do, with pay and display lighting!