Tag Archives: Mini Adventures

Take the Long Way Home

“Travel does not exist without home….If we never return to the place we started, we would just be wandering, lost. Home is a reflecting surface, a place to measure our growth and enrich us after being infused with the outside world.” – Josh Gates

Mini Adventures: The Dust Settles

Mini Adventures: The Dust Settles

We set off almost 4 months ago with a pocketful of Euros, a tankful of petrol and heads full of possibilities. We could not have imagined the wonderful places we have been privileged to see and the delightful people we met along the way. Now we have come full circle and arrived home, enriched by our experiences.

“For an occurrence to become an adventure, it is necessary and sufficient for one to recount it.” – Jean-Paul Sartre

This – my first venture into the world of blogging – was a way to keep in touch with family and friends and to keep a record of our experiences. I could not have imagined the numerous people we didn’t know who joined us along the way and the great feedback provided by so many. The enthusiasm spurred me on.

“I am looking for someone to share in an adventure that I am arranging, and it’s very difficult to find anyone.’
I should think so — in these parts! We are plain quiet folk and have no use for adventures. Nasty disturbing uncomfortable things! Make you late for dinner!” – J. R. R. Tolkein

Mio marito is not one of life’s natural adventurers, but once he had got used to the idea he threw himself into enjoying every moment with gusto! The majority of the photographs I have included on the blog are his, taken with his trusty Nikon D80 camera with an 18-135mm zoom lens. The remainder, including all the food photos, are mine, taken with my i-Phone.

“The purpose of life is to live it, to taste experience to the utmost, to reach out eagerly and without fear for newer and richer experience.” – Eleanor Roosevelt

This adventure may be over, but if I get my way there will be many more to come. I have loved writing this blog and so I intend to continue blogging under a different title; “Magic Spello” was a perfect descriptor for this particular experience but it will not best reflect future musings. I will post the name of my new blog on this page in case you want to follow it, otherwise ping me a message and I will let you know when it is live.

Until then, goodbye and good luck.

Post script: Join me on my latest blog at the link below.

http://indifferentreflections.wordpress.com

“Every mountain top is within reach if you just keep climbing.” – Barry Finlay

Homebirds

Homebirds

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Red Red Wine

Vines at Arnaldo Caprai's Winery, Montefalco

Vines at Arnaldo Caprai’s Winery, Montefalco

In 1955, Arnaldo Caprai set up a textile business which became one of the largest and most successful in Italy. A native of Umbria, in 1971 he bought a vineyard near Montefalco to fulfil his dream of reviving the fortunes of wine production in the area. Arnaldo’s son, Marco Caprai, took over the management of the Winery in 1988 and he has modernised production methods without losing sight of the traditional values and techniques. He also collaborates with Milan University on research and experimentation to ensure a sustainable future in an ever-changing climate.

Of the varieties of grapes cultivated here, the most revered is the Sagrantino, a variety that has been traced back 500 years and the one that produces the very finest of the Caprai wines. It has been said that the Caprai family has almost single-handedly reinvigorated the indigenous Sagrantino grape variety.

Today the vineyards under cultivation extend to 137 hectares and the Winery produces 700,000 bottles each year. Surely some of them could be ours? To ensure that this was the case (no pun intended!), off we went for a tour and wine tasting. The knowledgeable, patient and English-speaking Vivianne showed us around the fields and the production facility, explaining the history and cultivation methods.

Vats - Arnaldo Caprai Winery

Vats – Arnaldo Caprai Winery

French Oak Wine Barrels, Arnaldo Caprai Winery

French Oak Wine Barrels, Arnaldo Caprai Winery

There are around 20,000 barrels in use, mostly made of French oak. Not all of the wines are matured in oak barrels: it depends on what properties are required in the finished product. The bottling plant can produce 3000 bottles per hour, although it does not operate daily; the schedule is dependent on time of year (for example the period before Christmas is very busy) and the extent of orders. Although the Winery has continued production throughout the financial crisis of recent (and current) years, sales in Italy have shown a decrease, particularly for wines in the medium price range, but this has been somewhat mitigated by improved overseas sales.

That says it all. Arnaldo Caprai, Montefalco

That says it all. Arnaldo Caprai, Montefalco

And so to the tasting, accompanied by delicious meats, cheeses and bread. We tasted 4 wines: one white and 3 red.

Wine tasting selection, Arnaldo Caprai Winery. I'll play this hand!

Wine tasting selection, Arnaldo Caprai Winery. I’ll play this hand!

First up was the white Grecante, 2011, made from 100% Grechetto grapes and aged for 3 months in steel vats and a minimum of 3 months in the bottle. Fresh and crisp, slightly acidic with a grassy overtone and very delicious. Serve as an aperitif, or with fish or poultry.

Next we tried the Montefalco Rosso, 2010, a blend of 70% Sangiovese, 15% Sagrantino and 15% Merlot grapes. This is aged for 12 months in wood (70% of the time in Slovenian oak barrels and the remainder in French oak barrels) followed by a minimum 4 months in the bottle. The oak came through slightly but it was mellow with a subtle flavour. A perfect match with red or white meats, charcuterie or mature cheese.

Montefalco Rosso Reserva, Arnaldo Caprai

Montefalco Rosso Reserva, Arnaldo Caprai

We moved on to the Montefalco Rosso Reserva, both the 2007 and 2008 vintages. The Reserva is the same blend of grapes as the Montefalco Rosso, but  it is aged in oak for a longer period: 20 months in French oak barrels and a minimum of 6 months ageing in the bottle. Well-rounded, structured wine with subtle oak overtones and a long finish on the tongue. An excellent wine which would pair well with roasted meats, charcuterie and mature cheese.

Finally, the best of the bunch (no pun intended!). Collepiano Sagrantino di Montefalco. Made from 100% Sangrantino grapes and aged for 20-24 months in French oak barrels with a minimum of 6 months in the bottle. Robust, potent and rich in tannins, it exploded with flavour but had a velvety smooth finish.  Best accompanied by food; serve with good roast meats or game and mature cheeses.

Mio mario is very happy!

Mio marito is very happy!

Of course we liberated 2 cases of wine – 3 bottles of each one that we tested. Point of interest: in Italy a case of wine comprises 6 bottles not 12, in case you thought I couldn’t add up!  Time to reflect on our perfect day and to eagerly anticipate sharing the wines we took away with us.

Mini Adventures. Arnaldo Caprai Winery, Montefalco.

Mini Adventures. Arnaldo Caprai Winery, Montefalco.

Stairway to Heaven

There are several ways to travel from Spello to Assisi. The first, quickest but most boring, is via the main route SS75. Secondly, the local roads that go gently north through some small historic villages. And the road we chose. Right up almost to the summit of the Mountain, some 1290 metres (4230 feet) high. The mountain was (and perhaps still is) regarded as a sacred and mystical place; the beauty and solitude was certainly inspiring. The route follows an ancient cart track, winding steeply upwards with hair-raising hairpin bends (particularly when the driver is situated on the blind side of the car, as was I). The surface degenerated as we ascended, and soon we were driving over a pounded stone track, full of holes and rocks. Luckily we met few other cars (I should have wondered why) so were able to use the width of the road when things got really bad. The track was barely wide enough for 2 vehicles with very few passing places. Fortunately I was able to pull over when a large cattle truck approached from behind; we saw him shortly afterwards disgorging the animals onto the high pastures. We reached the snow line shortly afterwards.

Mini Adventure: Mount Subasio, Italy

Mini Adventure: Mount Subasio, Italy

Where do you take your Mini?

Where do you take your Mini?

When we did get the chance to stop, we were treated to superb views across to the Appenines.

View from Monte Subasio

View from Monte Subasio

Eventually we got our first view of Assisi, tumbling down the lower slopes of the mountain, the rose hue of its stones shimmering through the swirling cloud.

Assisi from Monte Subasio

Assisi from Monte Subasio

Assisi was the birthplace of Saint Francis, and it was here that he set up his religious order, based on the vows of poverty, chastity and obedience. The town is permeated by monuments and art commemorating the life and works of both Saint Francis and Saint Clare, who also lived and worked in Assisi. It is for this reason that the town remains a place of pilgrimage for many Christians, and is one of the main tourist centres in Italy.

The most significant monument is the Basilica of Saint Francis, constructed shortly after his death in 1226, although much of the internal decoration was added later. The Basilica dominates the town; externally I did not think it was beautiful architecturally, but inside it was visually stunning.

Basilica of Saint Francis, Assisi

Basilica of Saint Francis, Assisi

The Basilica consists of 2 churches: the upper church was built on top of the lower church and the crypt. All have been damaged to some extent by earthquakes, but the restoration has been well executed. The tomb of Saint Francis is in the crypt, along with those of several of his closest followers.

The lower church is rather dark, but the quality of the wonderfully rich art is superb. Some of the greatest artists of the age, including Giotto, Cimabue and the unidentified Maestro di San Francesco contributed to the frescoes. No photography is allowed, so the following photos are taken from postcards, just to illustrate the extent of the decoration.

Basilica of St Francis, Assisi. Lower church.

Basilica of St Francis, Assisi. Lower church.

Madonna and Child by Pietro Lorenzetti. Lower church, Basilica of St Francis, Assisi

Madonna and Child by Pietro Lorenzetti. Lower church, Basilica of St Francis, Assisi

The upper church is lofty and bright. Its art is more famous (though I am a fan of the lower church art), in particular the episodes from the life of Saint Francis are considered to be amongst the world’s great masterpieces. This fresco cycle was attributed to Giotto and his assistant, but more latterly is thought to be the work of the Maestro di San Francesco. But both Giotto and Cimabue are well represented in the art of the upper church.

Basilica of St Francis, Assisi. Upper church.

Basilica of St Francis, Assisi. Upper church.

Assisi, view from the Basilica

Assisi, view from the Basilica

Leaving the Basilica, we walked to the main square – the Piazza del Comune – which is largely medieval and well preserved. In fact, the Temple of Minerva (1st Century BC) and the Torre del Popolo (13th Century) can be seen in one of the frescoes of the life of Saint Francis!

Piazza del Comune, Assisi. Temple of Minerva and Torre del Popolo

Piazza del Comune, Assisi. Temple of Minerva and Torre del Popolo

The town was crowded with tourists, surprising this early in the year. It was disappointing that many of the restaurants and shops seemed to cater entirely for the tourists, with fast food and cheap religious souveniers everywhere. I have said before that I am not religious, but I love the architecture and art that organised religion has generated over the decades. I still find it distasteful that making money is such a key feature of many religious sites.

We called it a day at that point; it is just too much to take in on a single visit, so we will return to again do battle with the crowds.